Any serious cyclist will want to make sure they’ve invested in a reliable pump.  The trouble is, there are so many brands and models on the market that it can be tough to know what to choose.  

We’ve pulled together a handy guide on what type might be best for your needs, along with reviewing 6 of the best bike pumps on the market.

Best Bike Pump Quick-Find Table

Image Product
  • Stable and ergonomic
  • Smooth pumping action
  • Effective, leak-free pump head
  • Stable and ergonomic
  • Smooth pumping action
  • Effective, leak-free pump head
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  • Highly accurate digital pressure gauge
  • Incredibly efficient
  • Super stable
  • Highly accurate digital pressure gauge
  • Incredibly efficient
  • Super stable
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  • Inexpensive
  • Can also be used to pump up balls and inflatable toys
  • Stable design
  • Inexpensive
  • Can also be used to pump up balls and inflatable toys
  • Stable design
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  • Excellent value for money
  • Lightweight and compact
  • Inflates to high pressure
  • Excellent value for money
  • Lightweight and compact
  • Inflates to high pressure
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  • Super lightweight
  • Very compact
  • Efficient and ergonomic
  • Super lightweight
  • Very compact
  • Efficient and ergonomic
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  • Has a pressure gauge, despite being a hand pump
  • Increased flexibility with the removable hose attachment
  • Can be used with a Co2 canister
  • Has a pressure gauge, despite being a hand pump
  • Increased flexibility with the removable hose attachment
  • Can be used with a Co2 canister
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What You Should Be Looking For

There are several different elements you should consider when selecting a pump for your bike.  It’s hard not to get caught up in design elements that won’t make a big difference to the user experience.

Some of the key considerations are outlined below.

Floor vs Mini

Most cycling enthusiasts will have both a floor and a mini pump in their bike gear arsenal.  They each have their own advantages and disadvantages.

A floor pump is the one to keep in your workshop or garage.  With a free-standing design, they’re heavier and more robust than a mini pump.  They allow you to use both hands for a more efficient and strong pumping action.

Floor pumps also almost always have a pressure gauge to ensure you achieve accurate tire pressure.  They also have a bendy and lengthy hose that offers more flexibility.  It often saves you having to contort into awkward positions to inflate the tire, and you’re less likely to damage or break the pressure valve accidentally.

Mini pumps are designed to be portable.  They’re lightweight and compact.  You’ll want one of these to strap to your bike, keep in your pocket or carry in a rucksack while you’re on the road.  They can help if you have a slow puncture, you’re doing a long cycle, or your tire pressure isn’t right for the road conditions.

Unlike a floor pump, though, you’ll have to put in more effort during the inflation process.  They won’t always get you up to an ideal tire pressure, but, instead, one that will work just to get you home.

If you’re fastidious about accuracy, you may find it frustrating that not all mini pumps have a pressure gauge either.

Valve Overview

Generally, two types of valves can be found on bike tires.  You’ll need to double-check the type your bike has before opting for a pump.

Lots of high-quality pumps are compatible with both valve types, but, occasionally, they’ll only work with one.

Schrader valves are the more common type.  Also used on car tires, they are a wide, less sophisticated design that tends to be used on less expensive bike models.  

Handily, with this type of valve, if you’re caught short, you’ll even be able to inflate your tires from the air pump at your local petrol station.

Presta valves are a much more slender design and are capable of coping with higher air pressure.  This means they are invariably used on road bikes and sometimes on high-performance mountain bikes.

Presta valves aren’t usually as easy to connect to the pump, and their delicate construction means they need to be handled with more care.

High Pressure vs High Volume

The amount of pressure in your tires (referred to as psi) will depend on their shape, where you’ll be riding, and also your weight.  Narrow tires designed for road cycling need to have a higher pressure in comparison with trail riding mountain bikes.  

High pressure pumps don’t move too much air with each stroke.  This will help to avoid overfilling skinny road tires accidentally.  They are the most common type of pump.

High volume pumps, on the other hand, generate a lot of air in one stroke, making it faster to inflate a wider tire.  They’re often used for fat-tire or mountain bikes.  If you have a road bike with a high psi, this type of pump will struggle to reach the pressure required for optimal riding. 

Accuracy of Gauge

Selecting a pump with an accurate gauge can improve the comfort of your ride and the lifespan on the tires.

Every tire will have guidance on the maximum and minimum pressure acceptable detailed on their sides. The ideal pressure, however, can vary greatly depending on the surface you’re riding on, weather conditions, your weight and riding style.  You’ll often have to experiment to find the optimal pressure.

A lot of cyclists have a tendency to over-inflate their tires.  If you’re continually doing this, your bike isn’t going to absorb the bumps on the road as effectively, and there’s an increased chance of punctures occurring.  The lifespan of the tires will be impacted as a result.

Most mini pumps don’t have a gauge at all.  After all, they’re just designed for if you get caught out on the road.

Floor pump gauges can vary greatly in their accuracy, so it’s always worth checking how they compare.

Whatever one you opt for, don’t forget that tires will always leak a little air over time, and it’s important to check the pressure before heading out on a ride regularly.

Build Quality (metal vs plastic)

Generally, cheaper pumps will have a plastic design.  This keeps the cost down, and they’re usually lighter as a result.

A metal frame is heavier, but it will often stand the test of time much better, and it may also be more stable when in use.

Reviews of the Best Bike Pumps

There are a heck of a lot of bicycle pumps on the market.  It was tough narrowing it down to just six to recommend.  We’ve selected six reputable brand models (three mini and three floor pumps) that offer advantages for different riders and different budgets.

Top 3 Best Floor Pumps

Best Mid-Range Floor Pump

#1. PEdro’s Super Prestige

Max Tire Pressure160 psi
GaugeYes
Valve TypePresta / Schrader Compatible
Pump Weight3 lbs
Pump Height26 inches

What We Loved

The Super Prestige is a solid piece of kit, worth investing in.  The sturdy steel base prevents any annoying wobbles.  Plus, the long-stroke pumping action you can create is very smooth and easy and makes inflation quicker than normal.

The automatic locking pump head holds the valve in place incredibly securely.  You’re not going to have to worry about air leaking out while you work.  It also has a bleed valve that allows you to set the pressure easily.

The old version of this pump had the pressure gauge positioned lower down on the barrel.  Now it’s right up at the top, making it a lot easier to check.  You can also set the arrowhead on the gauge to the desired pressure to allow you to see when you’ve reached that point more easily.

With an unusually long hose, this pump saves you having to contort awkwardly to get a comfortable position when inflating tires.  It also means you’re less likely to damage a delicate valve in the process.

The Super Prestige, comfortingly, comes with a two-year warranty.  Given the robust nature of this pump, though. You hopefully won’t need to take advantage of this.

Why it Might Not Work For You

There are just a couple of small niggles.  If you’re on a budget, you might not want to splash out on a mid-range model like this.

It’s also a shame that the pressure gauge face isn’t the biggest.  You might have to squint to see the numbers on the dial.

Overall Verdict

If you’re looking for a dependable, functional workhorse of a floor pump, then the Super Prestige model from Pedro’s will be a wise choice. It’s stable, easy to use and allows a smooth pumping action.  

Not the cheapest model on the market, the Super Prestige has some nice extra features that are worth the extra few bucks.  The automatic pump head is easy to use and leak-free, plus the long hose offers a lot of flexibility.

>> Tap Here To Read More Reviews and See Today’s Price on Amazon.com <<

Best Top of the Range Floor Pump

#2. Silca Superpista Digital

SuperPista Digital Floor Pump
Max Tire Pressure220 psi
GaugeYes
Valve TypePresta / Schrader Compatible
Pump Weight5.5 lbs
Pump Height29.5 inches

What We Loved

The biggest selling point of the SuperPista is the high tech digital display and excellent build quality.  Even the best manual gauges attached to a pump can be slightly off with their readings.  

If you want to be right on the nose with your pressure levels, you won’t have any worries with this model.  It’s accurate to within 1%, which is pretty much unheard of with standard, off-the-shelf floor pumps.  That makes this pump the perfect option for those obsessive, performance cyclists that want to experiment with the pressure to get the levels just right.

The reading from the display is large and easy to see, and it allows you to measure in PSI or bar pressure, depending on your preference.  It even has a nifty feature allowing you to set an alert to let you know when you’ve reached the desired pressure.

The other big selling point with this model is the well-thought-out design which makes it a pleasure to use.  It utilises a metal shock piston, so you hardly have to apply any pressure to ensure a lovely smooth action.  No more sweating to reach a higher pressure.  

Why it Might Not Work For You

The price is the biggest stumbling block for this floor pump.  You can get a functional model that does the job for a fraction of the price.

The SuperPista is also a lot heavier than your average model.  It’s not going to be the most portable option.  It’s large tri-foot base does mean, however, that it provides great stability when in use.

Because the pump is longer than average too, folks with shorter arms may find it less comfortable to use when fully extended.

Overall Verdict

There’s no getting away from the fact that you don’t have to spend anywhere near as much to get a solid, functional pump.  

What you do get with the Silca Superpista, however, is a fantastically accurate digital gauge, that won’t leave you with any dubiety about the pressure your tires are sitting at.  

Plus, with a solid built and very easy pumping action, this should last you for many years to come.  It’s a bonus that the pump comes with a Lifetime Warranty.

>> Tap Here To Read More Reviews and See Today’s Price on Amazon.com <<

Best Budget Floor Pump

#3. Schwinn 5-In-1

Schwinn Bike Floor Pump
Max Tire Pressure150 psi
GaugeYes
Valve TypePresta / Schrader Compatible
Pump Weight2 lbs
Pump Height25 inches

What We Loved

Considering how economical this pump is, it’s surprising how reliable and effective it is.  Okay, the pumping action isn’t nearly as smooth as the fancy Silca model, but you can still get your tires inflated without too much effort.

Despite the price, it pumps up to a generous 140 psi and is compatible with both Presta and Schrader valves.  Plus, it comes with a needle that allows you to pump up balls and an adaptor to blow up pool inflatables.  It’s a handy choice for a family with kids – especially if you want to introduce them to using the pump themselves.  You’re not going to have to worry about an expensive investment if they misuse it.

The plastic design means this Schwinn model is a lot lighter than the other floor pumps we’ve reviewed.  This is handy if you are carting it out to the garden or the park to pump up the summer inflatables.

Why it Might Not Work For You

You can’t expect the same durability from this simple plastic design as you will from some of the more expensive metal models.

The up position locks the pressure valve, and this can be confusing as most pumps work in the opposite way.  It can also be frustratingly stiff and difficult to remove the valve from.  This can result in air leaking or even the valve getting broken.

Overall Verdict

If you’re an occasional cyclist looking for a simple but reliable pump that isn’t going to break the bank, you can’t go wrong with the Schwinn 5-in-1.  Just don’t expect any earth shattering design features.

>> Tap Here To Read More Reviews and See Today’s Price on Amazon.com <<

Top 3 Best Mini Pumps

Best Budget Mini Pump

#1. Topeak Pocket Rocket

Topeak Pocket Rocket Master Blaster Bike Pump
Max Tire Pressure160 psi
GaugeNo
Valve TypePresta / Schrader / Dunlop Compatible
Pump Weight0.24 lbs
Pump Length8.6 inches

What We Loved

Even if you’re not specifically searching for a mini pump on a budget, the Topeak Pocket Rocket has a lot to offer.

Very lightweight and compact, this pump will fit into generously sized pockets no problem.  If this is a problem, the pump even comes with a bracket to allow you to secure it to the bike frame.

It’s easy to use, the design is ergonomic and, despite the price, it’s well-made and durable.

Dedicated road bikers will like that this has an impressive maximum pressure of 160 psi.  It’s even compatible with Dunlop valves which can occasionally be found on imported bikes.

Why it Might Not Work For You

It’s always harder work to inflate tires using a mini pump rather than a floor pump. If you need to pump to a decent psi, you’ll need to be prepared for putting in a fair bit extra effort as the tires get fuller.

The pump comes assembled for use with Presta valves, and it can be a little tricky getting the hang of swapping the valve.  You might need a bit of practice connecting it with an effective seal for inflation.

Overall Verdict

Small, lightweight, reliable and inexpensive.  What’s not to love about the Topeak Pocket Rocket?  Plus, for a mini pump, it can inflate to impressively high pressures, making it a great choice for a frequent road cyclist.

>> Tap Here To Read More Reviews and See Today’s Price on Amazon.com <<

Best Top-End Mini Pump

#2. Lezyne Carbon Drive Lite HP

LEZYNE Carbon Drive Lite HP Bicycle Frame Pump
Max Tire Pressure120 psi
GaugeNo
Valve TypePresta / Schrader Compatible
Pump Weight0.17 lbs
Pump Length6.7 inches

What We Loved

For cyclists that like to go on adventures with minimal baggage, the well-made and stylish Lezyne Carbon Drive Lite HP could be a perfect choice.  Weighing a measly 80g, it’s so light and compact that you could easily forget you’re carrying it in your pocket.

Despite this, it still manages to reach pressures up to 120 psi, so it’ll work well for most types of bikes and riding styles.

Why it Might Not Work For You

Inevitably, the size means you’re going to have to work harder once you reach the higher pressures.  Anything over 100 psi and it can be a bit of a slog generating the pumping action towards the end.

The hose needs to be attached before use.  While this means you’re less likely to cause damage accidentally flexing the valve stem, it can be fiddly and tricky to attach.  This is a bit of a pain if you are caught at the side of a busy road!

Be prepared for a bit of wobble in the handle when you’re pumping too.

Overall Verdict

Despite being incredibly lightweight and portable, the Carbon Drive Lite is effective for inflating up to high pressures and is surprisingly durable.  

You’ll just have to be prepared for a little extra muscle power at high pressure, and you might need a bit of practice using the fittings and developing a good technique.

>> Tap Here To Read More Reviews and See Today’s Price on Amazon.com <<

Great Versatility

#3. CrankBrothers Klic

Crankbrothers Klic Hand Pump
Max Tire Pressure110 psi
GaugeYes
Valve TypePresta / Schrader Compatible
Pump Weight0.33 lbs
Pump Length10.2 inches

What We Loved

The biggest selling point of this Crankbrothers Klic HV hand pump is the fact that it comes with a built-in pressure gauge.  So, if you want to get more accurate inflation while out on the road, this could be the one to opt for.

The long, flexible hose clicks into place using powerful magnets and can be threaded separately to the pump.  You’re not going to be struggling with a fiddly bit of kit and losing air in the process as you can with some other models.  When not in use, the hose tucks away neatly out of sight.

If you want speedier inflation, you can even attach a Co2 canister to this model.

Why it Might Not Work For You

Unlike all the other pumps we’ve reviewed, this is a High Volume variety.  This will work great for wide mountain bike or fat tires, but it isn’t going to make it a great choice for the thin, high-performance road bike varieties.  The maximum pressure is the lowest of all those we have reviewed at 110 psi.

If you’re looking for a very compact option, the Klic HV might not float your boat either.  It’s almost twice as heavy as the Lezyne Carbon Drive and considerably longer too.

Overall Verdict

For serious mountain bikers that like to keep an eye on their pressure on long trips, the Crankbrothers Klic HV is a neat model with some great additional features.  It’s just not as lightweight or compact as some mini pumps.

>> Tap Here To Read More Reviews and See Today’s Price on Amazon.com <<

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